Kimberly Hanson of Salt Springs, Fla. was chosen by three-time NASCAR Sprint Cup Series champion Jimmie Johnson as the winner of Quaker State's World's Worst Commute Contest. For having the worst commute in America, Hanson will receive a trip for two to the Bank of America 500 race in Concord, N.C., on October 17, as well as an opportunity to go behind the scenes with Johnson at Hendrick Motorsports and at the track before the race.

 

"Selecting a winner was not an easy task," said Johnson. "All of the finalists really proved that their commutes push their engines and their patience to the limit, but when it came down to it, Hanson was the clear winner. Though it is not the same kind of driving I am used to, it is clear why her commute deserves the title of 'The World's Worst Commute.'"

 

Hanson's commute consists of a bumpy ride in a four-wheel-drive Jeep over a seven-mile washboard dirt road, where she sometimes gets stuck in deep mud or sugar sand. Along the way, she has to take a tugboat ferry and must wait up to 30 minutes to cross the St. John's River. After crossing the river, she must drive an additional 11 country miles to her job at Lakewood Rehab.

 

"It's so exciting that out of all of the entries and all of the difficult commutes in America, that my commute was chosen by Jimmie Johnson as the worst," Hanson said. "I think accompanying Jimmie Johnson on his ride to work will be the best commute I'll ever have."

 

The contest, which began on February 15, encouraged motorists to log onto www.QuakerState.com or visit Quaker State's mobile marketing tour, The Durability Tour, and submit 30- to 60-second videos highlighting why they have the "world's worst commute." The videos were subject to peer voting to determine the finalists, and the finalists' videos were viewed by a panel of judges from Quaker State and the Hendrick Motorsports staff, with Johnson making the final decision naming Kimberly as the winner.

 

Quaker State launched the contest to highlight its brand positioning of unsurpassed wear protection. The average American spends more than 100 hours a year commuting to and from work, according to the recent U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey. With the commute time being only a fraction of the time many motorists spend driving, it is important to protect a vehicle from friction-related wear and help it continue to run at optimal performance under any driving condition.